The Youngest Driver In Formula 1 Divides Opinion

17-year old Formula 1 racing driver, Max Verstappen, has caused quite a stir since he came onto the F1 scene in March this year. Son of former Dutch F1 driver, Jos Verstappen, Max is the youngest ever driver in Formula 1. Incredibly, he hadn’t passed his driving test when he joined the sport, so was … Continue reading “The Youngest Driver In Formula 1 Divides Opinion”

17-year old Formula 1 racing driver, Max Verstappen, has caused quite a stir since he came onto the F1 scene in March this year. Son of former Dutch F1 driver, Jos Verstappen, Max is the youngest ever driver in Formula 1. Incredibly, he hadn’t passed his driving test when he joined the sport, so was allowed to race at 200 mph around a race track but not permitted to drive on public roads. He has since passed his test and due to a regulatory change, his record as the youngest driver to race in Formula 1 will stand, since the minimum age for a super licence (the type you need to be allowed to race on track) has been increased to 18 years old.

Despite the backing of his famous father, Max has earned his place in F1 through talent. He rose quickly through the ranks of the Red Bull young driver programme and beat several other talented youngsters to secure a drive for Red Bull’s sister team in F1, Torro Rosso. It was widely expected that despite his talent, Max would not be able to cope with the pressure of the sport, which is notoriously ruthless if drivers underperform. Many of Max’s predecessors at the Torro Rosso team have been axed due to sub-standard performance, sometimes mid-way through the season. One one former Torro Rosso driver has gone on to achieve greatness in the sport. Sebastian Vettel joined Red Bull having been promoted from Torro Rosso and went on to win 4 consecutive world championships from 2010-2013.

Verstappen however, has risen to the occasion and has consistently surpassed expectations so far this season. He has been commended for his gutsy overtakes as well as outright pace and maturity. On the occasions that things didn’t go to plan, it was down to mechanical failures beyond his control. Red Bull boss, Dr Helmut Marko, recently told the current Red Bull drivers, Daniel Ricciardo and Daniil Kyvaat to pull their socks up because their counterparts at the sister team, Max Verstappen and Carlos Sainz, were outperforming them.

The young dutchman’s luck has changed in the last week as Formula 1 headed to Monaco for what is considered the jewel in the crown of the F1 season. Verstappen silenced his critics during the ‘free practice’ sessions on the Thursday before the race by driving around the street circuit in the 3rd fastest time. Fellow drivers and race pundits alike praised Max for his pace around a circuit that is incredibly difficult to master with its narrow track and tight bends that leave no room for error. But his inexperience showed on race day when he was trying to overtake Romain Grosjean’s Lotus at the Sainte Devote corner and ended up causing a huge collision.
Having placed his car in prime position to overtake the Frenchman. Verstappen was caught out when Grosjean braked earlier than expected before the corner and crashed in to the rear right wheel of the Lotus. Verstappen’s front left suspension broke on impact and his car crashed into the barrier at over 100 mph. The Lotus was able to continue with no obvious damage and fortunately, Verstappen escaped unharmed from the cockpit. Those watching the race live on TV has the best angle on the accident as the live footage at the time was from the onboard camera next to the driver’s helmet.

Formula 1 Rising Stars: Interview With Valtteri Bottas

Valtteri Bottas is regarded as one of Formula 1’s rising stars. And rightly so; in 2014, in only his second season in the sport, the Finn secured six podiums and finished fourth in the Drivers’ Championship, outperforming his more experienced teammate Felipe Massa.

Bottas’ breakthrough season greatly contributed to the resurgence of the Williams F1 team, which saw them finish third in the Constructors’ Championship; their best result since 2003’s second place.

The 2015 campaign, however, hasn’t quite got off to the start that the clear potential of the Mercedes-powered FW37 would suggest: Bottas failed to take the start of the Australian Grand Prix after injuring his back in qualifying, and he and teammate Massa found their race pace lacking in the searing heat of Malaysia.

I spoke exclusively to the Finn about his rise to Formula 1 and his expectations for the year ahead.

EH: You first got behind the wheel of a kart at the tender age of five, but your interest began a year earlier when you, along with your Dad, discovered a kart race during the summer. Can you tell me about that day and then your first experience in a kart the following year?

VB: Well, that day, I was actually going to Lahti (a town in Finland) with my father and we saw a sign about the go-kart Finnish championship race. We went there just to check it out, none of us was familiar with the sport. When I saw it the first time I thought it was really cool and wanted to get in to try one! My fist time actually trying a go-kart was about a year later, I was about 5-6 years old, and I actually crashed in the first corner of the first lap, as I did not use the brakes, and went off to the barrier. Nobody actually explained to me how it worked and they only said “Off you go”! That day, I learned from my mistake.

EH: In 2008 you won both the Formula Renault 2.0 Eurocup and the Formula Renault 2.0 Northern European Cup Championships. That is an enormous achievement, you must have been very proud of your efforts that year. How difficult was it competing in two championships?

VB: It was an important year and difficult too, as [I had] lots of races between two different championships. [But I needed] to get the support to move up to Formula 3. But overall it was good to get as much mileage as possible, the season went really well and I won both championships. This is also how I met and started working with my management (Mika Häkkinen, Didier Coton and Toto Wolff) so it was important to show them good results!

EH: You have had a very impressive season last year with six podiums, including your first Formula 1 podium at the Austrian Grand Prix on an unfamiliar track. Can you put into words how that felt and what thoughts were going through your head on the final lap, knowing you were mere seconds away from claiming your first podium?

VB: Austria was a very special moment, we had been chasing the podium for a long time and the last lap, even though you should never make any plans before crossing the finish line, I started thinking (as there was enough margin at the front and back) how cool it would be to cross the line and make the podium and meet my team when I get back, as the whole team had been working really hard for good results. The podium was very special, to see everyone there, it was a really nice day which I will remember forever.

EH: Last year Formula 1 veteran Felipe Massa joined the Williams team replacing Maldonado. What did you learn from his experience and knowledge of the sport, and how did it feel beating your more accomplished teammate in only your second year?

VB: My experience as a teammate of Felipe has been very good; obviously he is very experienced, he has been in different situations, car set-ups, different conditions, tracks. It has been good to work with him even though, as a racer, my goal is to be quicker than my teammate (whoever that is) and get more points.

EH: For a long time the Williams team appeared to be in racing ‘No Man’s Land’, but 2014 saw a dramatic shift in fortunes for the team. What do you think have been the major contributing factors to this remarkable turnaround for the team?

VB: I think the arrival of [Chief Technical Officer] Pat Symonds made a very big difference since joining the team mid-2013. He has been reallocating people at the factory, bringing new people to the team. Now we have the right people to the right positions and that definitely brought the results back. Another major contributing factor is the switch to Mercedes-Benz power units.

EH: For a country with a relatively small population, Finland has delivered three Formula 1 World Champions (and perhaps soon a fourth). What is it about your home country that sees it produce so many world class drivers in racing and rallying?

VB: First of all Finland is a motorsport country, it is part of our culture – we simply love F1 and rallying and it is true there are quite a few very good drivers from our country. Also, the level of go-karting (at a young age) is very high so this could explain it also. The mentality of Finns is also good for the sport, we can keep focused and don’t stress about things too much which is very important in F1 in my opinion.

EH: What are your first memories of following Formula 1 as a child and which driver/s did you most enjoy watching race?

VB: The first car I remember is the blue and yellow Williams car – my favourite in the beginning. One race that stands out as a race is Mika Häkkinen’s first win in 1997 in Jerez! I remember this race very clearly.

EH: After your most successful Formula 1 year to date in 2014, what are your expectations for 2015?

VB: In 2015 the competition is going to be much closer between the teams.

Motor Racing on TV: Formula One and Indycar

The global reach of television has given motor racing enthusiasts an opportunity to view both the traditional European-based Formula One competition as well as the Indy series long popular in the USA. Formula One racing has always been on tracks that include most of the features of ordinary motor roads, especially tight bends and moderate inclines, whereas Indy racing was for many years confined to special race tracks formed in an oval with banked curves at each end. Since 2005, however, Indy racing has increasingly included some events on road and street courses and these have come to predominate with only about one-third of races now taking place on oval tracks. In this respect, the two motor sports seem to have become more alike, but the contrast between Formula One and Indy racing on the oval track remains.

From a European perspective, sport in the USA in general seems to tend to the fast and spectacular, whereas Europeans, the British especially, take more interest in longer slower competitions with intermittent action. The contrast is perhaps most stark when comparing baseball with cricket. So it seems to be with motor racing, with the oval track in the USA allowing continuous near all-out speed, and the tight curves and chicanes of Formula One bringing the cars almost to rest, as, for example, at the Monaco Grand Prix event held annually around the narrow streets of the principality.

Indy racing on the oval track certainly presents a unique spectacle. The wide track allows several cars to race side-by-side and there is plenty of opportunity for overtaking. With the drivers maintaining almost flat-out speed, the race depends essentially on engine power. It all looks very dangerous, and this no doubt is the essence of its appeal. Crashes, when they occur, often involve multiple vehicles and are sometimes horrendous. Fortunately, with modern safety features, fatalities and serious injuries have been much reduced and this is an advance shared by Formula One.

Formula One is less visible to the spectator and the television viewer. Only at the start of the race can all the cars be seen together. For the rest of the race, the cars pass in and out of view in twos, threes and fours. Without a constant commentary it becomes impossible to know who is winning, as passing cars are soon found to be on different laps of the race. And whereas on the oval track the race leader is almost always in view, in Formula One the television cameras seem to ignore the leading car and concentrate instead on closely fought battles for fourth place or ninth place in the hope of recording a rare overtaking. Formula One presents a more difficult challenge to television, a challenge shared by Indy on-street races. For those who want shear spectacle on TV there is nothing to compare to the oval track.